Citizenship and Hungry Harvest

Citizenship, in my perspective is being a part of something. In a broader scale, usually, a citizen is defined as being a member of a country. Citizens often have rights that non-citizens wouldn’t have, such as voting rights, running for some office position and even work. This definition of citizen ship connects with civic agriculture in my perspective because it connects people to place and people to people. Hungry harvest, (CSA) is related to these aspects of citizenship because it connects people to people and people to place.
Hungry harvest connects people to people through identity. Laura B De.Lind says that civic agriculture “frames a collection of food and farming enterprises that addresses the need of local growers, consumers, rural economies communities and place”. The purpose of Hungry Harvest CSA at UMBC allows students who are financially insecure on campus access to healthier food options and at the same time, helps other financially insecure families outside of campus. Another example of people to people connection is the consideration of effort. People often waste food because they do not know what it takes to grow that food. Consuming the foods that are “not so pretty”, in my perspective, emotionally connects consumers to producers.
Hunger harvest also connects people to place. 40% of food goes to waste in the United States, I consider this an abuse to nature. Hunger collects the food and sells it to people at a low cost. For this reason, there is less food being thrown away. I believe that this connects people to place ethically especially knowing how many people lack the access to food, even the “not so pretty foods”. Fresh food, does not only require the effort the producers, but also the effort of nature such as land, water, sun etc.
Recently, I have been very appreciative to nature especially after knowing a little about permaculture. I find myself noticing small things about life that I never did before (such as the sun, vegetation, animals etc). Knowing that hungry harvest can actually connect me to nature, and to my community as a whole, gives me peace inwardly. <a href=" Citizenship, in my perspective is being a part of something. In a broader scale, usually, a citizen is defined as being a member of a country. Citizens often have rights that non-citizens wouldn’t have, such as voting rights, running for some office position and even work. This definition of citizen ship connects with civic agriculture in my perspective because it connects people to place and people to people. Hungry harvest, (CSA) is related to these aspects of citizenship because it connects people to people and people to place. Hungry harvest connects people to people through identity. Laura B De.Lind says that civic agriculture “frames a collection of food and farming enterprises that addresses the need of local growers, consumers, rural economies communities and place”. The purpose of Hungry Harvest CSA at UMBC allows students who are financially insecure on campus access to healthier food options and at the same time, helps other financially insecure families outside of campus. Another example of people to people connection is the consideration of effort. People often waste food because they do not know what it takes to grow that food. Consuming the foods that are “not so pretty”, in my perspective, emotionally connects consumers to producers. Hunger harvest also connects people to place. 40% of food goes to waste in the United States, I consider this an abuse to nature. Hunger collects the food and sells it to people at a low cost. For this reason, there is less food being thrown away. I believe that this connects people to place ethically especially knowing how many people lack the access to food, even the “not so pretty foods”. Fresh food, does not only require the effort the producers, but also the effort of nature such as land, water, sun etc. Recently, I have been very appreciative to nature especially after knowing a little about permaculture. I find myself noticing small things about life that I never did before (such as the sun, vegetation, animals etc). Knowing that hungry harvest can actually connect me to nature, and to my community as a whole, gives me peace inwardly.

Stefanie Choh

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s